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Bathroom Storage - Closed or open?

I love the vanities in my master bathroom.

First, there are two, and they are separate. My husband and I each have our own. (Yay!)

Second, each vanity has eight drawers. Six of the drawers are shallow, perfect for my hairbrushes and small tubes, and two are deep, great for my hairdryer and tall bottles. 

Closed versus open storage in the bathroom

All of those drawers are closed storage; I don't have to worry about putting my make-up away perfectly. If I can find what I'm looking for, I've been neat enough.

Open bathroom storage - shelves, tiled shower niches, and racks - required more effort. You have to find attractive items to put on or in them, and you have to pay attention to how you arrange those items.

So, think about how much you're willing to invest in open storage before you include it in your bathroom design. Jars and vases look great on bathroom shelves, and, since you don't use them every day, the only maintenance required is dusting. Rolled towels aren't too much hassle either.

A Bathroom Storage Case Study

Here's a bathroom I designed for a Walnut Creek, California couple. It includes:

  • Open storage shelves (right)
  • Closed storage in the form of a wardrobe (center) and at his vanity (left)

Remodeled Walnut Creek California bathroom with freestanding tub, blue painted vanities and cabinets, white painted cabinets, and open shelves

Photo by Boaz Meiri, Design by Jackie Lopey, CID 6284

On the other side of the room is:

  • Closed storage at her vanity (right)
  • Closed storage at the linen cabinet (left)

Remodeled Walnut Creek California bathroom with freestanding tub, blue painted vanities and cabinets, white painted cabinets, and open shelves

Photo by Boaz Meiri, Design by Jackie Lopey, CID 6824

How do you find the right balance between open and closed bathroom storage?

Here are some guidelines to get you going in the right direction.

  1. In small bathrooms, opt for closed storage. You can store more stuff that way, and the lack of clutter will make the space feel bigger.
  2. A little open storage goes a long way. Add just enough to make your design interesting and not so much that it takes over.
  3. For your closed storage, opt for variety. Include shelves and drawers, large and small cabinets.

 

Jackie Lopey, Certified Interior Designer & founder of Wide Canvas
She didn't know it, but Jackie Lopey's days as an advertising executive were numbered when she bought and renovated a 1950's bungalow. She soon went back to school and started her own design studio. Jackie is an award-winning, certified interior designer and the founder of Wide Canvas, a kitchen and bath design studio in Reno, Nevada.
 

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